A Year of Recipes: #27

Butter, sugar, eggs, milk, Fiber One cereal, vanilla extra, maple syrup, whole grain bread

Butter, sugar, eggs, milk, Fiber One cereal, vanilla extra, maple syrup, whole grain bread
Wow, this picture makes it obvious I replaced all the burned out light blubs in my kitchen.

I had a random craving for french toast last weekend.  I’ve shamefully never made french toast, so I figured why not?  To put a unique twist on the dish I found a recipe for crunchy french toast.

Like any normal french toast, the recipe starts by creating an egg mixture.  This part wasn’t any different from normal french toast.

A few months ago on a business trip, I had eaten crunchy french toast of a “light” breakfast menu at a hotel that I really enjoyed.  That french toast had a Fiber One coating, so I decided to stray from the recipe and do my own Fiber One coating.

I just wanted to remark on how exciting it is that this cereal is packed in two bags.  Amazing for people like me who are slow at getting through a box of cereal.

I just wanted to remark on how exciting it is that this cereal is packed in two bags. Amazing for people like me who are slow at getting through a box of cereal.

Mt. Fiber

Time to climb Mt. Fiber

The cereal goes into the food processor until it has a fine texture. This was actually a little bit tricky to get the consistency just right.  I have a good food processor that generally processes food evenly, but I had a lot of issues with some pieces of the cereal turning into fine dust while others were almost whole. The food also started to remind me of the feed you buy for $.25 at petting zoos for goats or ducks…

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Like normal french toast, I had to make up an egg mixture to dip the bread in.  I used a fork instead of a wisk because I am still working on the whole proper-kitchen-utensils thing.

After dipping in the egg and rolling in the Fiber One powder/crumbs/petting zoo feed, I had to cook two pieces at a time, since I couldn’t fit any more into my pan (which is certainly large enough.)  Getting them to cook wasn’t any problem.

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Certainly made for a pretty meal and they were fun to make.

In the end, these were okay.  I ended up needing to use a lot more butter to cook them since the Fiber One coating really soaked up all the moisture, leaving my pan too dry.  I actually had a pretty good time making these, but the next time I do french toast I’ll either do something traditional or try a different cereal.

Flavor 2/4 – Meh.  They tasted okay with syrup, but good french toast has enough flavor you barely need syrup.
Ease 
3/4 – This wasn’t exactly hard, but a little bit of a challenge just getting the cereal to stick.
Guiltless 2/4 – The calorie-to-feeling-full ratio on these just didn’t cut it for me.
Leftovers 2/4 – These were okay to reheat, but dried out very quickly.

A Year of Recipes: #26

Surprisingly simple: Lemons, flour, chicken, oil, chicken stock, butter

Surprisingly simple: Lemons, flour, chicken, oil, chicken stock, butter

I normally try to cook only things that are truly unique. I like exotic ingredients and combinations.  When I’m not doing something totally out there I tend to look for anything that puts a fresh twist on a classic dish.  Last weekend, however, I ended up making something that didn’t fall into this category.

I wanted to make one of my favorite meals to order when I dine out (when restaurants offer it!)  I really enjoy dishes with lemon, and this Chicken Piccata recipe from Giada De Laurentiis (serious girlcrush right here) certainly packs a citrus punch!

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IMG_5457The first step is to butterfly your two chicken breasts (I didn’t do a true butterfly, I kept the inner filet because I don’t want to throw good chicken out!) which leaves you with 4 pieces.  Those should be seasons and then dredged in flour.  I noticed quite a few people commented on the recipe that adding garlic powder at this step was good for this dish, and as a garlic fiend I followed suit.  I did not add salt at this step since my butter was salted (I was not going to buy salted and unsalted butter, 4 sticks is too much of either type.)

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Garlic just makes everything smell like heaven.

After this you brown up the chicken two pieces at a time.  I had a hard time getting the chicken hot enough according to my meat thermometer, which was honestly the most challenging part of this dish.

After the chicken has been successfully browned up, everything goes back into the pan along with the lemon juice and chicken stock.  Again, quite a few people on the recipe recommended using some white wine to deglaze the pan.  Chicken piccata with white wine is fabulous, but I had already purchased a 6 pack for the weekend and I decided leftover wine was not something I needed 🙂  Next time…

Everything just simmers for a few more minutes and then it’s done!

Flavor 3/4 – Not the best chicken piccata I’ve ever had, but certainly tasty!
Ease
2.5/4 – For some reason, getting these to brown up and reach a safe temperature was just a little more of a pain than it should have been.  Maybe it was a me problem…
Guiltless 3/4 – A little heavy on the butter, but calorie-wise these were great.  I really wanted to serve with pasta but that wasn’t a reasonable option…
Leftovers 3/4 – Surprisingly these were pretty darn good reheated!  Usually chicken dries out but these were not too bad.  I packed in my tupperware with the extra sauce in the container and really enjoyed both days I ate at work.